Hawaiian Culture – Black & Whites


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    Ka Hula

    $ 50
    If your image of the hula is that of graceful hips and cellophane skirts, you are missing what is the best of Hawaii.  To me it is the Kane, the men of the Hula that make it amazing.  Their power and strength, speed and perfection that keep people coming back, year after year, to the Merrie Monarch.

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    Ho’omakaukau

    $ 150
    This word asks “Are you ready!” and you will hear the Kumu Hula shout it out just before a performance.  The dancers then answer, “Aye” (yes) and step out.  Understanding the term is more than just  the words.

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    Kumupa’a

    $ 50$ 1,500
     The word “kumupa’a” means “To be built on a strong foundation of the past”. The Moku O Keawe Festival and Competition is the only international competition requiring performances in both Kahiko (ancient) and Auana (modern) styles. Great attention is paid, not only to beauty, skill and grace, but to language and interpretation. It is a strong foundation upon which the culture of hula will continue to grow.  

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    Chant in the Forest

    $ 50
    The image "Chant in the Forest" is from a performance held in 1988 at Volcano National Park on the Big Island of Hawaii. The unusual site is the traditional hula platform built in the young grove of rare native koa trees near the caldera's edge. Depicted are two of Hawaii's living treasures, Nalani and Pua Kanaka'ole.

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    The Three Kahunas

    $ 44
    The three men in the image “The Three Kahunas” are teachers of various arts.  Hale “Harry” Makua, to the far left, is a spiritual kahuna.  Sam Kai, in the center, is a teacher of history, as well as the warrior arts.  Kia, the man to the right, is a man of agriculture, one of the best known growers of Kalo (poi) in Waipio Valley, where he still cultivates the old Hawaiian way.

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    The Guardian

    $ 50
    At the foot of the Kohala mountains, on the shores of Kawaihai, stands the “Temple of the Lonely One”, Pu’ukohola.  This huge stone edifice stands today as a monument to the might and power of King Kamehameha the First.

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    Kumupa’a

    $ 50$ 1,500
     The word “kumupa’a” means “To be built on a strong foundation of the past”. The Moku O Keawe Festival and Competition is the only international competition requiring performances in both Kahiko (ancient) and Auana (modern) styles. Great attention is paid, not only to beauty, skill and grace, but to language and interpretation. It is a strong foundation upon which the culture of hula will continue to grow.  

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    Dog Dance

    $ 46
    This was a spine chilling dance where the warriors depicted dogs of war.  They are wearing boar tusk wristlets that were used in war to protect their wrists and dog tooth shin guards.  The dog tooth guards have also been used a musical instruments in kahiko hula.  This took place at Puukohola.  

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    Mana

    $ 30
    One of my favorite stories is how the image “Mana” came about.  I was doing a photo shoot with the Lim family, as I was illustrating a book about Hawaiian hula movements.  Nani is the Kumu, but for some reason she had to leave the beach and run back up to the car for something.  Lorna and I were talking and I said that while we had been doing some pretty straightforward thing like woman, ocean, palm tree and bay… how would one translate something without form…  for example the word “mana”, which mean more or less, “Heavenly Power”?  

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    Chant in the Forest

    $ 64
    Auntie Pua Kanaka’ole Kanahele told me once, “We are a part of the elements, the environment.”  To me this image of her and her sister, Nalani Kanaka’ole depicts that essence.   These two daughters of Edith Kanaka’ole and Kumu Hula of Halau o Kekuhi are committed to perpetuating the Hawaiian culture.  This is one of my favorite drawings as I feel that it resonates with how I feel about hula. 

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    Pau

    $ 44
    While most people who visit Hawaii experience some form of hula (some of it very good)in their evenings of Polynesian Luau shows, in reality, hula exists casually at real family and community gatherings all over the Hawaiian islands.  It is also performed with intense perfection at hula competitions, such as the Merrie Monarch Festival...

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    Bowl of Light

    $ 40
    The birth of a child, anywhere in the world, is a special thing. Each child brings a bright spot of light which, if nurtured and developed, can become a burning torch of wisdom and passion. To symbolize this, on the Hawaiian Island of Molokai, children are given a wooden calabash containing kukui nut oil and a wick. It is their bowl of light. 

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    Fern Lei

    $ 36
    Many places in the world have sand and sun, but nowhere else will you find the Hawaiian culture. In this piece I have done my best to accurately record several dancers of Halau O Kekuhi who earn the respect of all Hawaii for preserving this unique and beautiful part of their heritage.

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    The Guardian

    $ 40
    In 1991, the 200th anniversary of its construction was celebrated by the gathering of the first Na Koa or Hawaiian Regiment, seen in Hawaii in almost the last two centuries.  Dressed in malos, dog tooth and boar tusk arm and leg guards and armed with 18 foot spears or lava stone clubs – they are the guardians of the past, keepers of an almost forgotten art of war.

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    Pa’ana A Ka La

    $ 36